Music as Biology: What We Like to Hear and Why

Music as Biology: What We Like to Hear and Why

Credential
Department

Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

Beginner

English

6 weeks

Variable

Overview

The course will explore the tone combinations that humans consider consonant or dissonant, the scales we use, and the emotions music elicits, all of which provide a rich set of data for exploring music and auditory aesthetics in a biological framework. Analyses of speech and musical databases are consistent with the idea that the chromatic scale (the set of tones used by humans to create music), consonance and dissonance, worldwide preferences for a few dozen scales from the billions that are possible, and the emotions elicited by music in different cultures all stem from the relative similarity of musical tonalities and the characteristics of voiced (tonal) speech.

Like the phenomenology of visual perception, these aspects of auditory perception appear to have arisen from the need to contend with sensory stimuli that are inherently unable to specify their physical sources, leading to the evolution of a common strategy to deal with this fundamental challenge.

Instructors

Dale Purves
Dale Purves

Research Professor of Neurobiology; Research Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

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